Monday, May 18, 2015

Colorful Geometric Lamp Repair


This gorgeous lamp fell victim to my customer's little boy who accidentally bumped it over.  It sustained a few cracked pieces, three of which I was asked to replace.  This lamp is Chinese, though, and an exact match is not available here in the United States.  Fortunately, I had a piece in inventory which matched the transparency and the colors, so we decided to go ahead with the repair.  (Click on any photo to enlarge).

Here's a close up of Chinese glass which is not carried by any U.S. manufacturers. 


A view of the three pieces needing replacement.  The blue rectangle on the right has a major crack.
 My first step is to pull off the old solder and copper foil using needle-nose pliers.  Then I melt off whatever is remaining, using a soldering iron as shown.
 Then I use a piece of manila folder, hold it behind the opening and create a pattern for the exact-size replacement glass.

I used the pattern to trace the glass and then cut it using a pistol grip glass cutter.
 

Here I've applied adhesive copper foil to the borders of the opening.  I'm applying copper foil to the replacement glass.  

Soldering the piece in place.  Notice the blue painter's tape behind it, to hold the glass in the correct position.

Here's the new piece of glass, soldered in place.

Here I'm applying liquid black patina which reacts instantly with the solder.  Following the application of the patina, the lamp gets cleaned and then waxed.

 And here's the lamp, repaired and ready for many more years of enjoyment by the family.

And here it is, in its full glory, illuminated from below by a large light box.  Thank you Dan and Cara for finding me!  It was a pleasure repairing this for you.
Please visit my website to see my custom windows and repairs (click here).  And if you are on FaceBook, become a fan and I'll keep you up to date on all my stained glass projects.  Call me any time at 201-600-1616 or email with your questions. Thanks!

Tuesday, April 28, 2015

Cap repair to Stained Glass Lamp

This pretty, autumn colored stained glass lamp came to me with a loose cap and several small pieces of glass about to give way.  Here's how I went about repairing and strengthening it.  (Click on any photo to enlarge)

Shown below, the cap of the lamp had loosened, as did some of the small pieces of glass, as far down as the second row.

I started the repair by carefully melting off the solder around the cap and removing it from the base.

Then I melted off the old solder and copper foil around the edge with a hot soldering iron.

Several small pieces of glass were still firmly anchored to the cap.  I decided to leave them in place.  Here I'm melting off old solder and foil.

To further clean off the edges of the glass, I'm using a metal file.

At this point, I've cleaned off the old solder and foil and re-applied fresh foil where shown.

Here I'm burnishing the copper foil with a "fid" or flexible plastic wand.

In order to protect the repair and add strength, I've cut a length of flat, braided reinforcement wire and soldered it to the top of the second row of glass as shown.

To promote the adherence of the solder to the cap, I used a Dremel tool to clear off the patina on the inside of the cap.  This is a temporary measure.  I'll patina it black again when the repair is completed.
 Now I've replaced the three loose pieces of glass in the second row and re-fitted the pieces onto the top of the lamp.
 To further strengthen the repair, I'm "tinning" two pieces of thick gauge wire.  Tinning is a process whereby I coat the wire with liquid flux, then apply a thin coating of solder.  This will enable the wires to instantly bond with the solder on the inside of the dome.

Below, I've soldered the pieces and integrated the two wires along the lines inside the dome.  About half of the wire covers the cap, the other half extends onto the dome.
 Here I've applied black patina which reacts instantly with the solder.  I applied a generous amount of solder throughout the edge of the dome to ensure a solid attachment.
 Now the dome is repaired and ready for use again.
 And here it is!  Thank you Ed, for bringing the lamp for repair.  May you enjoy it for many years to come!
Please visit my website to see my custom windows and repairs (click here).  And if you are on FaceBook, become a fan and I'll keep you up to date on all my stained glass projects.  Call me any time at 201-600-1616 or email with your questions. Thanks!

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

New Stained Glass for a Weather Vane

The etched red glass in this antique late 1800's weather vane cracked .. It was a simple fix.  I had some old red glass in stock and used the cracked piece as a pattern.  Within a few minutes, I was able to hand it back to my waiting customer for her to re-sell at her upcoming street fair.  Yes, I do small repairs as well.

Please visit my website to see my custom windows and repairs (click here).  And if you are on FaceBook, become a fan and I'll keep you up to date on all my stained glass projects.  Call me any time at 201-600-1616 or email with your questions. Thanks!

Wednesday, April 8, 2015

Pet Portraits in Stained Glass

What a great way to honor or memorialize a much-loved pet.  We are now offering Pet Portraits in Stained Glass.  Just email me a few clear, good-contrast photos of your cat, dog, horse, bird or other pet.  For a nominal fee, I'll prepare a full-color computer rendition of your pet for your approval.  I'll also make recommendations for color and texture of glass, depending on your preferences. The computer renditions are a very close approximation of what the finished pet portrait will look like.  Let's get started!  Remember also that we are happy to work long distance through email and the phone.  Thanks!


Please visit my website to see my custom windows and repairs (click here).  And if you are on FaceBook, become a fan and I'll keep you up to date on all my stained glass projects.  Call me any time at 201-600-1616 or email me with your questions. Thanks!




Thursday, April 2, 2015

Beveled Sun Catcher Repairs

This unique sun catcher resembles something that M. C. Escher may have created.  Its composed of several square bevels which are joined at 90 degree angles.  When its in the sun, it casts bright little rainbows all around.  It was purchased many years ago by my customer in Sugarloaf, a New York State craft village.  Here's how I went about repairing it.  (Click on any photo for a closer look).

Here's the starting point .. Four bevels detached from the hanging.  It took several minutes to figure out the exact positioning for the repair. 

Here I'm tugging off the old copper foil and solder to prepare for the repair.

Melting off the hanging hook.  

As is the case with many stained glass pieces, these bevels were never grinded.  Here I'm using a metal file to grind the edges of the bevels.  This enables the copper foil to adhere better, giving the repair a longer life.

Cleaning off the old adhesive.
 Using a "fid" to burnish the copper foil onto the edges of the bevels.

 Here I'm using a "Professional Boxer" to maintain a 90 degree angle for each of the replaced bevels.

I taped the bevels in place to prepare for fluxing and soldering the joint between the two bevels
 

Now the pieces have been re-attached.
 The edges of the bevels on this piece were never completely finished.  The sides showed the old copper foil which is not the optimal way to create it.  Therefore, I used steel wool to brighten up the old foil.  Then I fluxed and "tinned" the edges, meaning that I applied a thin coating of solder.  Adding that extra solder on the edges will also serve to strengthen the piece.
 It's coming along well now.  I've added additional foil to that center piece.  The solder on top will add strength and a better look.
 Here I'm soldering the foiled sides.
 Now the sides of all the bevels have been tinned.  I'm applying black patina with a metal acid brush for a uniform look.
 The hanging hook is a very small piece of bent wire.  Here I'm cleaning it with steel wool.
 Now the hanging hook has been melted back onto the piece and I've patina-ed it as well.  After this step, I applied Liva Stained Glass Finishing Compound to the entire piece to give it shine and to protect the patina.

And here it is, complete and ready for the sunlight.


When this piece is in the sunlight, it throws dancing rainbows all around.  Beautiful!

 Another view of the finished piece.
 Thank you, Dawn, for bringing this to me for repair.  A fun challenge!  May you enjoy it for many years to come.

Please visit my website to see my custom windows and repairs (click here).  And if you are on FaceBook, become a fan and I'll keep you up to date on all my stained glass projects.  Call me any time at 201-600-1616 or email with your questions. Thanks!



Tuesday, March 24, 2015

Repair to matching Urn Lamps

These gorgeous lamps had a structural issue which needed repair.  Both of the tops of the urn were sinking due to the weight of the fixture and dome above.  Here's how my husband Eric and I went about repairing them .. Click on any photo to enlarge ..

Here's a view of the base of one of the two identical lamps.


 The top of the urn is supposed to be straight across.  Here you can see how it sunk down from the weight of the fixture and dome above.  (Dome is not pictured).

We began the repair by detaching the fixture and then removing all of the sunken pieces from the top part of the base.  Then my husband Eric created and attached four metal supports, as shown, around the interior of the dome.
  

Many lamps have glass which has not been grinded along the edges.  These two are no exception.  Grinding the glass helps the copper foil to adhere.  Here I'm using a hand file to roughen up the edges.

This photo shows both lamps with the  top  pieces of glass removed.  The one on the left has been copper foiled, the one on the right has not.

Below, I've added new copper foil to the grinded edges.  I've also cleaned and added copper foil to the pieces at the top and replaced them onto the base.
 Below, I'm replacing the glass at the top.  Note that my husband has numbered each piece for proper placement.  These pieces have been thoroughly cleaned and foiled.  I've also coated the foil with flux and soldered them in place.


Notice that, at the request of my customer, I left one piece out for ventilation.  There is a small bulb in the base of the lamp which gives off heat.  Here I'm brushing the soldered areas with black patina which gets thoroughly cleaned aferwards.

Here is one of the lamps, with ventilation and the other pieces replaced, soldered, and patina-ed.

I positioned the ventilation openings at the back of the "on/off" switch so that it will not be visible when the domes are replaced. Both lamps have been repaired.


Another view of the repaired lamps, ready for their domes and many more years of use.  Thank you, Margarita, for bringing them to me!
Please visit my website to see my custom windows and repairs (click here).  And if you are on FaceBook, become a fan and I'll keep you up to date on all my stained glass projects.  Call me any time at 201-600-1616 or email with your questions. Thanks!